Minard + Napoleon + Neatline

[Cross-posted from dclure.org] Open the Exhibit Yesterday I made the hop across the country to Boston for the NEH Workshop on Digital Methods for Military History at Northeastern University, where I’ll be giving a couple of workshops about Neatline and soaking up lots of interesting new projects from old friends and new friends alike. Beautiful…. Continue reading “Minard + Napoleon + Neatline”.

Bonjour! Je m’appelle Julia.

Bonjour, Laboratoire des Savants! Hello! I’m Julia, one of the new Makerspace student consultants. When I’m not being a smiling face at the SLab desk, I am a first year M.A.-Ph.D. student in French. I am brand-new to Charlottesville and to UVa, and so far I’m loving everything, particularly this miniature Tour Eiffel, which was…. Continue reading “Bonjour! Je m’appelle Julia.”.

What. The. Junk.

So I had to take a sick day yesterday. Stuffy nose, scratchy throat, headache, grouchiness. Attempting to brighten my day, Wayne sent me a nice text message: Turns out he was joking. He actually said “totally” when I asked, but that turned out to be a lie. Today, here’s what I came back to: So…. Continue reading “What. The. Junk.”.

Upgrading Neatline and Omeka

One of my first projects here at the Scholars’ Lab was to help update some Omeka/Neatline sites. These are sites we keep around as examples of our Neatline plugin for Omeka, and they were a few versions behind. While a pretty easy process to do by hand, having a script to take care of it makes…. Continue reading “Upgrading Neatline and Omeka”.

Visualizing Early America through MapScholar and Beyond

Hello, DH World! As this is my first official post as a DH Grad Fellow in the Scholars’ Lab, I’d like to start it by thanking the folks in the Lab for the opportunity to join the team for this academic year. I feel really fortunate that I have the chance to hang out with…. Continue reading “Visualizing Early America through MapScholar and Beyond”.

A Fox… Among Others

The fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing. Greetings! I am Swati Chawla, a second year PhD student at the department of history. The question, “Can the masters’ tools dismantle the masters’ house?” posed at a dhpoco talk last year resonated with my work on Tibetan exile in India, and was the reason I applied for the Praxis…. Continue reading “A Fox… Among Others”.

Individuality and Collective Effort

Hey everyone! My name is Steven Lewis. I’m a second-year Ph.D. candidate in Music. My research interests include late 20th century jazz neoclassicism, early jazz, and 19th century African-American secular music. In my most recent project, I explored jazz performance as a means of constructing counternarratives of black American music history. I earned a BA…. Continue reading “Individuality and Collective Effort”.

Prism in the Classroom: Questions to Frame Discussion

Cross-posted on my personal site. I have been touting the use of Prism in the university classroom for some time now, but a recent exchange with Annie Swafford suggested to me that it might be worth explicitly outlining how I would go about doing so. With that in mind, I’ve composed the following set of questions…. Continue reading “Prism in the Classroom: Questions to Frame Discussion”.

Let’s Play

Hi. I’m Andrew Ferguson. Three years ago, while fighting my way through English Lit exam lists full of doorstop novels and deep-end theory, I decompressed with a hobby that seemed as far from literary scholarship as could be: watching other people play videogames online, in archived or livestreamed forms called Let’s Plays, or LPs. And,…. Continue reading “Let’s Play”.

The Digital Sea of Exchange

Greetings! My name is Jennifer Grayburn and I’m a sixth-year PhD Candidate in the History of Art and Architecture Department at the University of Virginia. My research focuses on medieval Northern architecture and its intersection with Old Icelandic texts. Using cultural memory theory and sea-basin frameworks, my dissertation explores the spread of architectural ideas, especially…. Continue reading “The Digital Sea of Exchange”.

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