Candace Barrington & Jonathan Hsy on Digital Hospitality

February 2, 2017
2:00 pm–3:30 pm
Alderman Library, Room 421

The Medieval Studies Lecture Series and the UVA Interdisciplinary Graduate Medieval Colloquium present:

Candace Barrington & Jonathan Hsy
Digital Hospitality

Barrington and Hsy’s joint presentation will outline some basic principles of archive and database creation that have been integral to the way their Global Chaucers project (with its international collective of scholars, translators, and enthusiasts) has developed and the shape it has taken.  This public event is co-sponsored by UVA’s Program in Medieval Studies, the Department of English, the Scholars’ Lab, and the Classics Department.

Candace Barrington, a Professor at Central Connecticut State University, pursues two research interests. The first examines the intersection of legal and literary discourse, leading to several articles and co-edited volumes. Currently, she is co-editing the Cambridge Companion to Medieval English Law and Literature with Sebastian Sobecki (University of Groningen). Barrington’s second research interest examines Chaucer’s popular reception.  In this vein, she has written American Chaucers (2007) and contributed articles to Sex and Sexuality in a Feminist World (2009), American Literary History (2009), European Journal of English Studies (2011), Dark Chaucer: An Assortment (2012), Medieval Afterlives in Popular Culture (2012), Digital Gaming Re-imagines the Middle Ages (2013), Educational Theory (2014), Screening Chaucer: Absence, Presence, and Adapting the Canterbury Tales (2016), and Cambridge Companion to Medievalism (2016). In a broader context, she and Jonathan Hsy collaborate on Global Chaucers a project focusing on non-Anglophone adaptations and translations. With Hsy, she maintains an active blog and has written articles for Medieval Afterlives in Contemporary Culture (2015), Accessus (2015), and postmedieval (2015). Together they are co-editing an issue for the Global Circulation Project at Literature Compass. Because of her interest in teaching and Chaucer’s global reception, she is a founding member of the Editorial Collective for the Open Access Companion to The Canterbury Tales, a project developing a free, high-quality, open-access introductory volume reaching Chaucer’s global audience of English readers from a wide diversity of institutions.

Jonathan Hsy is Associate Professor of English at The George Washington University and (with Alexa Huang) founding Co-Director of the GW Digital Humanities Institute. He specializes in medieval literature and culture with interests in translation theory, digital media, and disability studies. Author of Trading Tongues: Merchants, Multilingualism, and Medieval Literature (2013), he is founder (with Candace Barrington) of Global Chaucers an international network and online community that explores Chaucer’s legacy in contemporary non-Anglophone contexts; together with Barrington, he is co-editing a collection on global appropriations of Chaucer for Literature Compass. Among Hsy’s current book projects in the field of disability studies are a book on life writing by medieval authors who self-identified as blind or deaf, and a “minigraph” on the cultural history of eyeglasses (from the ambivalence of late-medieval poets upon the emergence of rivet spectacles to the techno-utopianism of “early adopters” of Google Glass). Hsy currently serves on the Modern Language Association’s Committee for Disability Issues in the Profession, and his publications on disability and digital media have appeared in Accessus, Cambridge Companion to the Body in Literature, New Medieval Literatures, Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, PMLA, and postmedieval. He serves on the Steering Committee of the BABEL Working Group and blogs at In the Middle, a group medieval studies blog.

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