Visualization and Data Mining

Plane Table Mapping aka Instant Gratification Mapping

“Plane table mapping is the most interesting of all to do.  One can hardly browse through an account of its various operations without wishing to go directly into the field and do them.” – Down To Earth : Mapping for Everybody, 1944 Humans love maps.  Every day in the Scholars’ Lab we help aspiring cartographers…. Continue reading “Plane Table Mapping aka Instant Gratification Mapping”.

Podcast: Micki Kaufman on Quantifying Kissinger

Digital Humanities Speaker Micki Kaufman “Everything on Paper Will Be Used Against Me”: Quantifying Kissinger Scarcity  of  information  is  a  common  frustration  for  many  historians.  However,  for  researchers  of  twentieth-­ and  twenty-­first  century  history  the  opposite  problem  is  also  increasingly  common.  In  contrast  to  scholars  of ancient  history,  who  base  much  of  their  analyses  on …. Continue reading “Podcast: Micki Kaufman on Quantifying Kissinger”.

DH Speaker Series: Micki Kaufman on Quantifying Kissinger

Everything on Paper Will Be Used Against Me: Quantifying Kissinger Thursday, April 3 at 10:00 am in Alderman Library, Room 421 Click for a larger image.  See www.mickikaufman.com/qk for a detailed description. Scarcity  of  information  is  a  common  frustration  for  many  historians.  However,  for  researchers  of  twentieth-­ and  twenty-­first  century  history  the  opposite  problem  is …. Continue reading “DH Speaker Series: Micki Kaufman on Quantifying Kissinger”.

Mapping Crowd Sourced Bicycle Data

Background Charlottesville is not the easiest place to ride a bicycle.  There are obstacles beyond the narrowness of the streets.  Let’s take a look at a few of these. The above map shows the elevation around Charlottesville with dark green being the lowest areas and bright red being the highest.  The Charlottesville street system is…. Continue reading “Mapping Crowd Sourced Bicycle Data”.

Size Matters

In geography, size matters.  On maps, large always wins over small.  We’re human.  We’re wired to quickly spot patterns and make visual comparisons.  See Tufte, Edward. Picture a map of your own state.  How does it compare in size to the states next door, the largest states, the smallest, or Texas? I recently joined with…. Continue reading “Size Matters”.

Data visualizations: Learning d3.js

[cross-posted at katinarogers.com] The SCI study on humanities graduate programs and career preparation is humming along, and while survey responses come in, I’ve been working on determining how best to translate the data into meaningful graphics. After a lot of experimenting, I think the winner is d3.js. Short for for Data-Driven Documents, D3 is Michael…. Continue reading “Data visualizations: Learning d3.js”.

Prism and Praxis Reflections

It’s been a whirlwind of a year, but we finally made it! We have a fully functional tool, we’ve fulfilled our goals from our charter, and we can all look back on everything we’ve learned this year and be astonished by how far we’ve come. Although I wasn’t an absolute newbie to the DH and…. Continue reading “Prism and Praxis Reflections”.

Seeing the Prism: We Have Visualizations!!

I am happy to report that we have successfully build visualization capabilities into Prism!  Once users have highlighted the text according to the set categories, the users click on the submit button, which takes them to the visualization page! The users can then click on the categories at the right-hand side of the page to…. Continue reading “Seeing the Prism: We Have Visualizations!!”.

Let’s get visual.

I am aware of how ridiculous the title of this post is, but I’ll gloss it by saying that visualizations have been a hot button issue in our recent Praxis talks, and in my opinion, they’re by far the “sexiest” element of Prism. After all, the viz page is where the magic happens. That being…. Continue reading “Let’s get visual.”.

Mapping the Catalogue of Ships

I’m very pleased to share a guest post by UVa Classics professor Jenny Strauss Clay, describing a new project we’ve undertaken at the Scholars’ Lab. We’re excited not only at the opportunity to use GIS techniques to test Professor Clay’s theories about the relation of ancient geography to mnemonic devices and poetic form, but also…. Continue reading “Mapping the Catalogue of Ships”.

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