Visualization and Data Mining

Why To Teach Students to Not-Read Novels

Scholars’ Lab Fellow James Ascher went to Washington and Lee University to give a workshop in Prof. Taylor Walle’s ENGL 335 course through a Mellon-funded collaboration with the Scholars’ Lab in the UVA Library. More information about this initiative can be found here. His post is cross-listed on the W&L blog. This post has a simple argument: if…. Continue reading “Why To Teach Students to Not-Read Novels”.

Visualizing Paper Evidence Using Digital Reproductions

Digital images both lie to us and tell us truths that exist outside of our normal perception. The lie comes about through both deliberate distortions and distortions produced by limitations in digital and in other reproduction methods. The limitations of reproductions are easy to see for anyone who considers the situation carefully, but understanding the…. Continue reading “Visualizing Paper Evidence Using Digital Reproductions”.

Working with an Archive of the ‘Now’

Given our subject matter for the 2016-17 Praxis cohort, we recognized early on that we would be grappling with a very different sort of archive than we’ve grown accustomed to as humanists. Instead of the stacks, journal databases, manuscripts, and historical objects, we’d have to take a serious look at Facebook, Instagram, Vine, Snapchat, and…. Continue reading “Working with an Archive of the ‘Now’”.

Programmatically Building High-level Charts with Bokeh

A couple of months ago, while preparing for the Digital Humanities 2016 conference, I was trying to build a series of charts to visualize data results from some topic modeling I had done. Specifically, I had a data file in which each row was a document and the columns were topic proportions. Reading across any…. Continue reading “Programmatically Building High-level Charts with Bokeh”.

Working with D3, Part 2

When did I eat all those candies? This second visualization will answer the above question, and also which candies I ate. This visualization will show each day, and within each day it will show the time period that I had candy, and an image of the candy will designate what kind of candy, and how…. Continue reading “Working with D3, Part 2”.

Working with D3, Part One.

Track-n-Treat Halloween is great. Free candy. And I have six kids to go out and get it for me. 🙂 I cull some of the finest chocolates from their bags after trick-or-treating and enjoy them throughout the next week. We usually eat everything within a week… This year I decided to track how much candy…. Continue reading “Working with D3, Part One.”.

The Ghost in the Graph: A Recap on Time, Things, and Entanglement

[This post is the protein-rich version of a series of related posts from our Praxis site, with fresh reflections on the process and product now that I’m done. If you want to see originals, check out the project idea, the data itself as I recorded it, a first attempt at a visualization, and a second…. Continue reading “The Ghost in the Graph: A Recap on Time, Things, and Entanglement”.

Visualizing Early America through MapScholar and Beyond

Hello, DH World! As this is my first official post as a DH Grad Fellow in the Scholars’ Lab, I’d like to start it by thanking the folks in the Lab for the opportunity to join the team for this academic year. I feel really fortunate that I have the chance to hang out with…. Continue reading “Visualizing Early America through MapScholar and Beyond”.

Plane Table Mapping aka Instant Gratification Mapping

“Plane table mapping is the most interesting of all to do.  One can hardly browse through an account of its various operations without wishing to go directly into the field and do them.” – Down To Earth : Mapping for Everybody, 1944 Humans love maps.  Every day in the Scholars’ Lab we help aspiring cartographers…. Continue reading “Plane Table Mapping aka Instant Gratification Mapping”.

Podcast: Micki Kaufman on Quantifying Kissinger

Digital Humanities Speaker Micki Kaufman “Everything on Paper Will Be Used Against Me”: Quantifying Kissinger Scarcity  of  information  is  a  common  frustration  for  many  historians.  However,  for  researchers  of  twentieth-­ and  twenty-­first  century  history  the  opposite  problem  is  also  increasingly  common.  In  contrast  to  scholars  of ancient  history,  who  base  much  of  their  analyses  on …. Continue reading “Podcast: Micki Kaufman on Quantifying Kissinger”.

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